InClass

Be deliberate in your approach to dealing with classroom frustration — your well-being (and your students) will thank you. With all the responsibilities that the job entails, a teacher’s energy is a precious commodity. Guard your emotional well-being like it’s your most precious resource — because

Sep 19, 2019

Be deliberate in your approach to dealing with classroom frustration — your well-being (and your students) will thank you.


With all the responsibilities that the job entails, a teacher’s energy is a precious commodity. Guard your emotional well-being like it’s your most precious resource — because it is!

The next time frustrations run high, take a moment and try out one of these four alternatives to indulging in the negative.

1. Recognize that your frustrations are valid.


It’s important to acknowledge and feel your frustrations. It’s even important to voice those frustrations; the key is being selective to whom you voice them. When you need to vent about a rough day, choose someone who is close to you and far from the situation. These are the individuals most likely to allow you to own your frustration, but not be consumed by it. (The teacher’s lounge is not a productive place to vent.)

2. Focus on the things you can control.


Channeling your energy into the things you can control is half the battle; then, you have to let go of the rest. It can be freeing to simply acknowledge a frustration, while recognizing that it’s not your problem to solve. If your frustration involves something you can control, get to work! Otherwise, you’re better off putting your energy into something else.

3. Remember that your students are watching your every move.


If students see you engage in a given behavior, they’ll consider it fair game for themselves. If you complain about your boss, your students will complain about you. Or if you vent frustrations about coworkers, your students might mistreat the classmate they don’t agree with. Be a teacher who models the behavior you want to see.

4. Give yourself time to avoid an overreaction.


Taking time to process your emotions is critical. A quick response doesn’t give you enough time to consider the ramifications of your reaction. When you’re frustrated, take a few minutes to cool off or vent to a neutral observer, far from the situation. Assessing the situation from a place of objectivity (or as close as you can get to it) is far more likely to end in a positive resolution.

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Arizona K12 Center

@azk12 Dec 05, 2019 23:14:19

RT @staceyhicks81: Just a reminder for those waiting for scores, your report will be provided via your National Board account. Don't forget…

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