InClass

Rest. Refresh. Reset. Teachers savor the long days of summer for many reasons: time with family, a well-deserved break from the classroom, an opportunity for new learning to take back and implement, and a chance to recharge. As the start of the new term approaches, employ these five strategies to h

Jul 30, 2019

Rest. Refresh. Reset.


Teachers savor the long days of summer for many reasons: time with family, a well-deserved break from the classroom, an opportunity for new learning to take back and implement, and a chance to recharge. As the start of the new term approaches, employ these five strategies to help you prepare.

Check in with your emotions


This isn’t as frou-frou as it sounds, we promise. Ask yourself one question: How do you feel about going back to work? Write down the emotions that come to mind. You might be excited, nervous, or stressed — or some combination of the three. Once you’ve committed your feelings to paper, put an action item next to one or two. For example, if you wrote “stressed,” think about steps you can take to mitigate this, such as making a playlist of mood-boosting songs or asking a friend to assist in classroom set-up.

Recalibrate your body clock


The schedule shift from “relaxing summer” to “hectic fall” can take a toll on your body. Ease into this transition a few weeks before school starts. Set your alarm to wake up earlier, plan meals to coincide with when you normally eat during the school year, and go to bed at the same time every night (free sleep apps can aid in increasing shut-eye). Establishing your work routine before work officially begins helps prime your body for the frantic first month of school.

Make a list


Nothing makes a new school year more manageable than getting organized, and nothing brings structure better than a good old-fashioned list. Psychologists consider list-making to be a positive process that clarifies the sense of inner chaos many of us feel when things get overwhelming. Write down everything you’d like to accomplish before school starts, such as arranging your classroom, buying supplies, and completing paperwork. You can also add creative ideas, too, like plans for colorful décor or possible field trips and guest speakers.

Get social


A leisurely lunch or lively happy hour with colleagues not only lets you brainstorm ideas, collaborate on techniques, and share planning ideas with fellow teachers, but it also offers a chance to reconnect before students show up. Plus, other teachers know the unique and complicated feelings that come with the start of the school year — they “get it.”

Treat yourself


From feel-good purchases, such as fancy pens, elegant stationery, a pretty calendar, or a new coffee mug, to feel-good personal indulgences like a massage or a facial, find a way to pamper yourself in celebration of a successful start to the school year.

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Arizona K12 Center

@azk12 Dec 05, 2019 23:14:19

RT @staceyhicks81: Just a reminder for those waiting for scores, your report will be provided via your National Board account. Don't forget…

Arizona K12 Center

 

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