InClass

Learning doesn’t stop when the school year ends. Introduce these activities now to help keep students’ momentum going all summer long. Summer is almost here, and your students are more than ready for it. But before that last bell rings, set them up for a successful break by introducing them to thes

May 03, 2019

Learning doesn’t stop when the school year ends. Introduce these activities now to help keep students’ momentum going all summer long.


Summer is almost here, and your students are more than ready for it. But before that last bell rings, set them up for a successful break by introducing them to these summer activities that will help them fend off the summer slide.

Share your summer reading list


Students are often intrigued by the personal lives of their teachers. Why not use that curiosity to get them excited about summer reading?

Make a list of what you plan to read over break, and share it with your students. If possible, include a diverse selection of genres, and emphasize you’ll be reading for enjoyment. Encourage students to create their own lists and share them with one another.

Set them up with interactive journals


Show your students how to flex their writing muscles for fun without the pressures of a formal essay. Carve out some class time to help them prepare take-home interactive journals. The prompts can be as simple as asking them to create lists or draw something they’ve seen, or using quotes as writing prompts. Soul Pancake offers oodles of inspiration.

Plan summer scavenger hunts


Help your students incorporate some adventure into their summer by having them think outside the box when brainstorming their own scavenger hunts for break. For example, maybe a student wants to collect family stories that they’ve never heard before from parents, grandparents, or guardians. Or maybe they’d like to visit a new location, like an art museum or installation, and look for certain shapes, colors, or designs. This simple activity can provide students with a new way of exploring and interacting with the world around them.

Get students hooked on podcasts and audio books


Every teacher would agree that listening skills are incredibly important, not only in the classroom, but in everyday life. Take advantage of the plethora of podcasts and audiobooks out there to share a few age-appropriate options with your classroom. Once they see that there are options for students of every stripe, hobby, and interest, they’ll be hooked.

Play non-digital games


Students of all ages love games. Plus, your students will welcome a break from regular lessons at the end of the year. Help them experience the fun of interacting with one another in real time (no screens needed!). Blank Slate, The Awkward Storyteller, and Utter Nonsense are a few of the latest games to try that encourage players to exercise language and social skills while having a blast.

Related Content

InClass
Closing Achievement Gaps: A Lesson From Dr. Donyall Dickey

Closing Achievement Gaps: A Lesson From Dr. Donyall Dickey

An upcoming training explores ways you can shift your school’s or district’s instructional program to make sustainable improvements that can help close achievement gaps.

Read More
InClass
Breaking News: How to Discuss Current Events in the Classroom

Breaking News: How to Discuss Current Events in the Classroom

When it comes to discussing current events in your classroom, don’t be scared — be prepared. Students today are inundated with current events thanks to a 24-hour news cycle and constant media alerts delivered to their phones. The complex issues and emotions surrounding these events can be difficult

Read More
InClass
More with "Learning and Growing through Work with Refugee Students and Families with Kathleen Paulsen"

More with "Learning and Growing through Work with Refugee Students and Families with Kathleen Paulsen"

In this week’s episode of 3Ps in a Pod, you heard from Kathleen Paulsen, New Teacher Mentor in Balsz School District, about her journey from being an anxious first-year teacher in a classroom with many refugee students to a mentor to first and second-year teachers working in their own diverse class

Read More

Get weekly teaching tips, helpful resources, and important Arizona education news!

Sign up for our email newsletter today.

Arizona K12 Center

@azk12 Dec 05, 2019 11:41:05

This week on #3PsinaPod: Dr. @DouglasReeves on grading, including 3 things he would like to see change, creative wa… https://t.co/5pmUrT7Ajf

Arizona K12 Center

 

Please Wait
View Cart (0)