InClass

Discover four ways to incorporate money into your lesson plans, even if you're not a math teacher. Celebrate Money Smart Week! Money doesn’t grow on trees, but as teachers, we can make it more prevalent in our lesson plans. April 23-30 has been named 2016 “Money Smart Week.” Reward students with “b

Apr 27, 2016

Discover four ways to incorporate money into your lesson plans, even if you're not a math teacher. Celebrate Money Smart Week!


Money doesn’t grow on trees, but as teachers, we can make it more prevalent in our lesson plans. April 23-30 has been named 2016 “Money Smart Week.”

  1. Reward students with “behavior bucks.” Whether you teach second grade or freshman English, students enjoy reaping rewards for good behavior. Maybe you “pay” students for a job well done or service-oriented acts that benefit the classroom. Then, allow them to “buy” items like homework passes, time with the class pet, an opportunity to be line leader, etc. Teaching students to balance their budgets and be responsible for their earnings may prompt money-savvy futures.

  2. Assign a journal reflection about money and resources. Allow students to write or draw in response to a question like, “If I had a million dollars I would…” While some may say they’d buy a new sports car or mansion, others might suggest they’d donate money to charity. Whatever their responses, engage in dialogue about money-smart choices and how financial decisions can impact them now and in the future.

  3. Combine culinary, finance, and language arts by asking students to write a recipe, including the costs and instructions associated with cooking their favorite meal. Looking to use this with older students? This lesson plan could be used in a foreign language class, which will require students to learn new words and phrases.

  4. How might you integrate technology with a finance-driven lesson plan? Ask students to come up with their top three money-saving tips and record a public service announcement. Elementary students might suggest people “share their toys with others instead of parents buying each child their own,” while high schoolers may encourage people to “use YouTube to fix broken items before heading to the repair shop.” Whatever it is, remind students that creative problem solving often helps save money.


Looking for ways to learn to refine your math lesson planning? Join the Arizona K12 Center for the Summer Math Institute on June 21-23 in Tucson, Arizona.

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Arizona K12 Center

@azk12 Dec 13, 2019 02:01:06

@SmilinAZTeacher @ClassroomChamps @StarlightPark1 That is beautiful! And what lovely parents!

Arizona K12 Center

 

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