InClass

Centers don’t have to be chaotic or stress-inducing for teachers. When used correctly, and in tandem with technology, educators can use rotational strategies to lighten their load. Increased productivity, heightened student learning, and meaningful work — sounds like a teacher’s dream. You can make

Jan 09, 2017

Centers don’t have to be chaotic or stress-inducing for teachers. When used correctly, and in tandem with technology, educators can use rotational strategies to lighten their load.


Increased productivity, heightened student learning, and meaningful work — sounds like a teacher’s dream. You can make this vision a reality by integrating technology into centers for your learners. While some believe rotational tasks are limited to students in elementary or middle school, high schoolers (and beyond) can benefit from the strategic learning opportunity.

Here’s how to plan so centers will work for you:

  1. Time yourself. There’s nothing worse than giving students a task you think will take them 30 minutes, only to realize they’re done much quicker. Set aside time to practice with the apps and websites to set realistic time-based goals for your students. Be sure to put yourself in the learner’s shoes and remember it might take time to get comfortable with the technology, while also pairing it with content.

  2. Differentiate. One of the benefits of technological advancements is the way you can cater to a variety of students. Research and utilize apps that can be navigated by beginners and experts. Watch to see how quickly your students progress through the levels or tiers.

  3. Integrate or model social media. At the end of a rotation, ask students to summarize their learning in 140 characters or less. If you’re not a Twitter fan, have students create a status that they’d deem post-worthy about the information they learned. Remind individuals that once something is published on the internet, it’s remains in cyberspace forever. This is a great opportunity to teach digital citizenship and the importance of developing clear and concise takeaways.

  4. Use formative assessment. Yes, technology can be fun, but it is truly a teaching and learning tool. After allowing students to listen, watch, record, or stream content, gather feedback and check for understanding. Here are a few apps to use for coordinating formative assessment.


Do you like the sound of technology-infused centers? Don’t just take our word for it; learn more from Tony Vincent during Spruce Up Your Centers with Technology. Join us for the one-day training at the Arizona K12 Center on Jan. 28.

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Arizona K12 Center

@azk12 Dec 13, 2019 02:01:06

@SmilinAZTeacher @ClassroomChamps @StarlightPark1 That is beautiful! And what lovely parents!

Arizona K12 Center

 

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