Constructive Learning: Entry Level

K-4 Lesson

Broad Stripes and Bright Stars

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Grade Level

2

Classroom Configuration

  • Whole group instruction, using a projector and/or interactive white board

Arizona State Content Standards

  • Social Studies
    Strand 3: Civics/Government

    1. Concept 1: Foundations of Government
      1. PO 1. Describe the history and meaning of national symbols, documents, songs, and monuments that represent American democracy and values:
          1. a. American flag
          2. b. Pledge of Allegiance
          3. c. National Anthem
          4. d. America the Beautiful
          5. e. The U.S. Capitol
          6. f. Liberty Bell
    1. Concept 4: Rights, Responsibilities, and Roles of Citizenship
      1. PO 1. Discuss examples of responsible citizenship in the school setting and in stories about the past and present.
      2. PO 4. Identify traits of character (e.g., honesty, courage, cooperation and patriotism) that are important to the preservation and improvement of democracy.

     

    Arizona Common Core Standards: ELA
    Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity
    2.RI.10
    By the end of year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
    a. By the end of year, read and comprehend functional texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical  texts, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.
    Comprehension and Collaboration
    2.SL.1
    Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 2 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
    a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
    b. Build on others’ talk in conversations by linking their comments to the remarks of others.
    c. Ask for clarification and further explanation as needed about the topics and texts under discussion.

    Arizona Educational Technology Standards (2009)
    1. Strand 3: Research and Information Literacy;
      1. Concept 2: Processing, Locate, organize, analyze, evaluate, synthesize and ethically use information from a variety of sources and media.
        1. PO 4. Use appropriate digital tools to synthesize research information and develop new ideas.
    Objectives
    1. Students will list and discuss information from a video.
    2. Students will understand how the American flag was first made.
    3. Students will understand character traits of good citizenship: courage, patriotism, as they relate to historical events and persons.
    4. Students will be able to describe the symbols in the American flag.
    5. Students will make a personal connection to the flag.
    Procedure
    1. Use the Teacher’s guide from the Smithsonian National Museum of American History for warm-up, thematic, and follow-up discussion questions for each of 4 segments of this video title Broad Strips and Bright Stars.
      1. Show one segment at a time.
      2. Before each segment, use Focus Questions with whole class.
      3. Following each segment, use Discussion Questions with whole class.
    2. Thematic Warm-Up Questions
      1. What do you know about the American flag? (physical description of the flag, places where you can find one, ideas about symbolism)
      2. Have you ever heard the song The Star Spangled Banner?  How does it make you feel? What words or phrases do you remember from the song?

     

    1. Act of One: Broad Strips and Bright Stars
      1. Focus Questions (share with students before watching)
        1. What is the main character, Mary Pickersgill, making? Who else is helping her with her project?
        2. What hints does Mary Pickersgill give you about the setting for this play?
      2. Discussion Questions (review with students after watching)
        1. How large do you think the blue piece of fabric will be when it is unfolded?
        2. Where is Baltimore? Can you find it on a map? What other cities are nearby?
    2. Act of Two: Broad Strips and Bright Stars
      1. Focus Questions (share with students before watching)
        1. Why is Mary Pickersgill making this flag? How will it be used?
        2. If Mary Pickersgill’s parents were involved in supporting the Revolutionary War, what year or time period do you think is the setting for this play?
        3. Listen for ways Mary Pickersgill thinks the war is affecting everyday life.
      2. Discussion Questions (review with students after watching)
        1. How did Mary Pickersgill’s mother get commissions during the Revolutionary War?
        2. How did her mom’s experience as a flagmaker help Mary?
        3. Could lead to discussion on jobs that are performed by several generations of a family.
        4. What skills do you think would be helpful in making a flag?
        5. What is a privateer? Do you think it’s right that Mary Pickersgill may have asked a privateer for help on a flag for the government?
    3. Act of Three: Broad Strips and Bright Stars
      1. Focus Questions (share with students before watching)
        1. How do you think you would feel after sewing a flag all day?
        2. How many stars does Mary say will be on her flag? Why does she say the number of stars should be changed?
      2. Discussion Questions (review with students after watching)
        1. How many stars are on the flag we use today? What do those stars stand for?
        2. Mary said, “George Washington once said that for him, the stars symbolize the heavens and man's divine aspiration to achieve.” Can you think of any other signs, symbols, or flags that include stars?

    Act of Four: Broad Strips and Bright Stars

      1. Focus Questions (share with students before watching)
        1. Listen to hear what the flag stands for to Mary, her mother, and her daughter.
        2. How large does Mary say the final flag will be? (42 feet by 30 feet)
        3. Bonus Question: The flag will be 30 feet tall. If each stripe is 2 feet tall, and 7 stripes are underneath the canton, how tall is the canton? (16 feet)
      2. Discussion Questions (review with students after watching)
        1. What are the advantages and disadvantages of having a flag so large?
        2. Do you have a special memory of seeing the American flag? To you, what does the American flag stand for?
    1. Students will label parts of the flag as symbols and colors, and what they represent.
      1. They will also answer the question:  What are the character traits of a person of today with good citizenship? Use your answer to prove that someone you know is a good citizen.

    Materials

    1. Lesson Plan with Extension Activities from Thinkfinity: americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/pdf/BroadStripesBrightStars.pdf
    2. americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/
    3. Act One of Broad Strips and Bright Stars: americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/Videos/Stars1.asx
    4. Act Two of Broad Strips and Bright Stars: americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/Videos/Stars2.asx
    5. Act Three of Broad Strips and Bright Stars: americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/Videos/Stars3.asx
    6. Act Four of Broad Strips and Bright Stars: americanhistory.si.edu/starspangledbanner/Videos/Stars4.asx
    7. Computer with Internet connection
    8. Projector
    9. Speakers
    Assessment
    Teacher will examine the students’ work on the will labeled parts of the flag and on their essay answer.

Technology Integration Matrix

Active

Collaborative

Constructive

Authentic

Goal Directed